5 Most Common Reasons Why People Quit Van Life


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There are many reasons people quit van life, from the expense to being homesick. Van life can be a demanding lifestyle, but the benefits of living the van life far outweigh any shortcomings. Why do people quit van life though?

Here are the 5 most common reasons why people quit van life:

  1. Homesickness
  2. Lack of money
  3. Mechanical troubles
  4. Lack of preparedness
  5. Trouble living in close quarters

Van life is a lifestyle that requires sacrifices and dedication, like any other lifestyle. Most people quit for one or more reasons, but I’ll discuss the five most common reasons people quit van life in this article.


1. Homesickness

One common reason why people quit van life is that they struggle with homesickness. This can be challenging to deal with in such an isolated environment where there aren’t many distractions from day-to-day chores and tasks. 

There is a good chance that homesickness may set in for anyone with a huge support group in their hometown or have something that they left behind.

It’s possible to overcome homesickness by immersing yourself in your new surroundings and surrounding yourself with positive friends who are experiencing similar challenges as you are.

One way around this issue is simply staying in the same place longer than anticipated, as it may take some time before you feel completely settled into your new routine. You can always mediate homesickness with smaller short trips to and from your home base more frequently.


2. Lack Of Money

This happens because some people spend more than they earn when they first start living in their vehicle or campervan (or RV). They may work at that time or be supported by family/friends, which makes them feel ok about spending more than what they have earned so far. 

But if you don’t expect this from your income yet, then you’ll need to save up before quitting your job. You will thank yourself.

Many people quit their jobs while on the road because they aren’t able to handle all of the freedom at first. They weren’t aware ahead of time how much energy it takes to maintain a home full-time while traveling around continuously for weeks or months on end. 

This work includes: 

  • Laundry
  • Grocery shopping
  • Cooking every meal from scratch.
  • Cleaning dishes after each use.
  • Finding a good/safe place to sleep

Van life maintenance can wear someone out very quickly after a while. But physically, it doesn’t seem like it would be so draining.  

But it is, and most people aren’t aware of this until they’ve tried living the lifestyle for a while.


3. Mechanical Troubles

One of the main reasons that people quit van life is because of mechanical troubles with their van. Since most people are not mechanics, this is very understandable.  

If you have someone in your group who knows their way around cars and vans, then they might be able to help out with some of the issues while on the road. But if not, it’s essential to know where local repair shops are so that you can get back home without too much trouble.   

Another option would be for one person or another in your van life community to take a class on auto repairs so that they could do basic maintenance themselves. This will allow them to save money on mechanic bills by doing simple fixes at home before taking something major into the shop next time there’s an issue.

One other solution for mechanical troubles is looking into purchasing some extra roadside assistance through your auto insurance.  


4. Lack of Preparedness

People may quit if they aren’t prepared for the lifestyle and all that comes with it, including driving through rough terrain at night without proper lighting to having a hard time finding amenities like showers and bathrooms.

It’s also common for someone not to know what to expect when they start their journey or where exactly they want to go. 

While it can be easy taking off down an open road daydreaming about being free from responsibility, reality will set in eventually after months of cramped quarters traveling across nearly empty highways with no end goal. 

Most people fail at their ventures into van life because they underestimate just how hard this lifestyle really is. 

Some may think that simply choosing what kind of vehicle will suit them best makes up for anything else lacking in their lives, such as solid savings accounts or several months of food storage. 

Van life isn’t always as glamorous as many make it out to be. 

Related Article:
How To Prepare for and Deal With Storms During Van Life

5. Trouble Living in Close Quarters

Another thing that causes people to give up on their dreams of living full-time in a van is that they become uncomfortable with the idea of living in such close quarters. 

Sleeping, cooking, and socializing with your partner within an enclosed space can make it easy to grow tired of each other if they don’t get along, or if they have different priorities when it comes to life on the road.

If you’re having trouble living in close quarters with another person, one solution is to spend more time outside of the van. Lifestyle changes are also very difficult to adjust to when you’re accustomed to having friends around constantly or going out every weekend with your old crew during work hours. 

And if you don’t have much in common with other van lifers/the outdoorsy types who were already friends before quitting life on the road, then finding new friends can feel like hunting for needles in haystacks.


Why You Need To Maintain Van Living

There are ways to mitigate most issues with van life, but it’s important to consider all of your options. 

Van life can be a difficult lifestyle to maintain, but the benefits of living in your van outweigh any shortcomings. One of the most popular reasons people quit is homesickness or lack of money, and mechanical troubles. 

However, it’s easy to overcome these setbacks if you plan appropriately and know what to expect when starting out with this type of lifestyle.

Here are some of my favorite van life essentials:

Thank you for reading this article. I hope you found it helpful as you’re experiencing your life on the road. Here are some tools and gadgets I use on a daily basis that made my van life a lot easier. I hope you’ll also find them as useful as me. These are affiliate links, so if you do decide to purchase any of them, I’ll earn a commission.
But in all honesty, these are the exact tools that I use and recommend to everyone, even my closest friends and family.

Kitchen: I’m cooking a lot and I’ve finally found my perfect cookware set: The Magma Cookware 10 Pcs that you can nests and store in less than 1/2 cubic foot of cabinet space is really handy. Since I’m also spending a lot of time working at my desk, I use my favorite coffee mug from Yeti. For more, check my list of kitchen accessories I can’t live without.

Outdoor: Even though I’m spending a lot of time in my van working, I do enjoy getting out and explore my ever-changing neighborhood. This sometimes requires me to take my portable solar battery with me. And when I just want to chill outside and take a nap, I use the Winner Outfitters Hammock.

Clean/Tidy: Space is precious and therefore I used these heavy-duty storage bins from Homs to store my material. They’re robust and you can stack them together. Regarding showering, I like to use this portable solar shower from Advanced Elements when it’s hot outside.

To see all of my most up-to-date recommendations about van life, check out this resource that I made for you!

Martin

As an independent traveler, I try to share my positive and negative observations about van life as well as tips and tricks to make your life on the road easier. I travel and work in my old RV and would greatly appreciate a coffee from you if you find my content useful.

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